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Archive for the ‘Herbal Medicine’ Category

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Common symptoms include:

  • Difficulty waking in the morning
  • Need caffeine to get going
  • Feeling overwhelmed by everyday tasks
  • Pronounced fatigue in the afternoon between 2-5pm
  • Feel better in the evening and more alert around 10-11pm
  • Waking between 2-3am with busy or anxious thoughts
  • Eyes over-sensitive to bright light
  • Weakness or dizziness if you don’t eat frequently
  • Anxiety over things that didn’t bother you before
  • Increased irritability
  • Mild depression

If you have four or more of the above symptoms then you may have adrenal fatigue. This is a complaint we commonly treat at the clinic. A saliva test can assess your cortisol and DHEA levels and a combination of therapies are used to best address your individual needs. For further details call the clinic or PM me.

Insomnia, or the inability to fall asleep or remain asleep, has been and continues to be treated using (Chinese Herbal Medicine) CHM to the present day. A recent study in the journal Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine evaluated and reviewed the use of CHM for insomnia treatment in Taiwan. The study showed that there were 16,134 subjects who visited traditional Chinese Medicine clinics for insomnia in Taiwan during  2002. In addition, several studies have demonstrated that CHM treatments effectively benefit sleep quality, improve sleep duration, and exhibit reduced side effects in comparison to Western medicines.

The most commonly prescribed Chinese herbal formula for insomnia was Suan-zao-ren-tang. This formula consists of 5 individual herbs grouped together for the most beneficial synergistic effect. The primary herb in this formula isZiziphus spinosa, or Suan-zao-ren (a.k.a., sour jujube seed). This herb has been shown to cause a sedative effect at higher doses and an anxiolytic effect at lower doses. Another study found that the formula Suan-zao-ren-tang produced an increase in non-rapid eye movement sleep, and it is believed that the mechanism was by the stimulation of serotonin receptors. The other herbs in this formula include Chuan-xiong (Szechuan lovage root), Fu-ling (poria), Zhi-mu (anemarrhena rhizome), and Gan-cao (licorice root).

It is important to note that whereas Western medicine attempts to treat insomnia as an isolated symptom, traditional Chinese medicine examines the condition of the body as a whole system, taking into consideration signs and symptoms ranging from appetite, thirst, mood, tongue color, and the quality of the pulse to reach a diagnosis. For this reason, not all patients suffering from insomnia will be given the same formula – some people will receive the Suan-zao-ren-tang formula mentioned above, while others could receive any one of a handful of other herbal formulas more appropriate for treating the underlying imbalance causing their insomnia.

Acupuncture treatments are usually given in conjunction with the herbal medicine mentioned above to enhance the effect of the treatment. Needles are inserted in carefully chosen points on the body depending on the traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis for each patient. Two acupuncture points often used in the treatment of insomnia include Yin-tang, which is located on the forehead between the eyebrows, as well as Shen-men, which is a point located on the ear. Both of these points have the effect of calming and sedating the patient.

The Insomnia study mentioned above concludes that our understanding of the mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine treatment for insomnia will benefit from further examination through continued clinical studies. However, the long-term application and popularity of this method of treatment in Taiwan and other Asian countries gives a strong indication of the potential benefits Chinese herbal medicine can offer for people throughout the world.

 

So why suffer through another sleepless night when help is at hand. Contact us today.
Sources for this article:

http://ecam.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/short/nep018v1?rss=1

Chinese Herbal Medicine Materia Medica, 3rd edition, by Dan Bensky, et al.

Acupoints & Meridians, edited by Liu Gongwang, et al.

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2011/236341/

Learn more:http://www.naturalnews.com/026189_insomnia_Chinese_herbal.html#ixzz1uGeE8CBb

Jiao Gu Lan is one of the many tonic herbs with the Chinese Materia Medica.  Jiao Gu Lan has to be one of the greatherbs in the world! So much longevity and health restoration is associated with this herb. It is almost hard to find a place to start with when it comes to the healing and corrective properties of this herb.

A lot of the following information is taken from studies done in China, Korea and Japan on Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP) and its gypenosides:

Let’s first take a look at its Cholesterol Lowering Abilities: Jiao Gu Lan lowers total cholesterol by making it larger in size and thereby reducing its numbers in testing. It also raises HDL (which is not a cholesterol at all as the medical system would have you believe but is a protein binder). More than 20 papers have been published on the subject with effectiveness reported as ranging from 67 to 93%. It also inhibits platelet aggregation which lessens the chance of a stroke or heart attack; which cholesterol lowering drugs do nothing for.

As for blood pressure, 223 patients were divided into three groups. One group took Ginseng, the next took Jiao Gu Lan and the last took the blood pressure medication, “Indapamide”. The effectiveness was rated at 46% for Ginseng, 82% for Jiao Gu Lan and 93% for Indapamide. Jaio Gu Lan modulates blood pressure, lowering it when it is too high and raising it when it is too low.

As an antioxidant, this herb has been shown in tests to lower the amount of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide in certain white blood cells, an excellent indicator of antioxidant activity. Jiao Gu Lan also has the remarkable property of increasing endogenous SOD (Superoxide Dismutase) in the body. SOD is one of the body’s most important antioxidants and studies show that charting SOD levels in various animal species is a reliable indicator of their longevity. Trials in humans showed that SOD levels returned to youthful levels after taking 20 mg of Gypenosides (active principle) daily for one month.

Jiao Gu Lan also modulates the nervous system. It calms an overexcited nervous system and stimulates a depressed one. 300 professional athletes were the subject of a study. All the athletes reported that taking this herb before competition made them vigorous and alert with quick reflexes. Yet, it also made them less nervous.

112 cases of insomnia reported a sleep improvement of 89 to 95 percent.

This herb modulates lymphocyte formation and increases lymphocyte activity. It was also found to greatly enhance the activity of NK (Natural Killer) cells in cancer patients. Animal tests proved that crude gynosaponins possessed obvious anticancer and anti-ulcer attributes, inhibited the side effects of glucocortico-hormones, promote cell metabolism, benefit sleep and lower blood lipids. Gynosaponins might be able to inhibit the multiplying of cancer cells in the liver, uterus, lung, etc. by as much as 20-80%. (Shown by tests with mice using experimental sarcoma-180.)

So as you can see, Jiao Gu Lan offers a wonderful range of verified health beneifits without any of unpleasant side-effects of pharmauctial drugs that are often prescribe to treat high chlorsterol, high blood oressure, insomnia and aniexty.

So contact us today and discover how Jiao Gu Lan
Learn more:http://www.naturalnews.com/023077_herb_health_herbs.html#ixzz1YsDUCULx

Chinese herbs may work better and have fewer side effects for endometriosis treatment than conventional drug therapies, according to a new review of previous studies, carried out at Southampton University in the UK and Beijing University of Chinese Medicine. Researchers re-examined two studies in which more than 130 women suffering from endometriosis participated. In the first study, sufferers were given the hormonal treatment gestrione, or herbal therapies, for three months following surgery to remove endometrial patches. In the second study, Chinese herbal treatment was compared with another hormone drug, danazol, for three months with no surgery. Chinese herbs were found to relieve post-surgical symptoms more effectively than the conventional hormone-based drug therapies, with a nearly 96% success rate of complete symptom relief, as compared to only 10% with danazol. The herbs caused virtually no side effects, while a significant number taking hormone medication suffered increased period pain and irregular periods, acne, fatigue, weight gain and evidence of liver damage. Women taking the Chinese herbal treatments were also 10% more likely to become pregnant following surgery than those taking prescription medication. The original studies were carried out in Chinese hospitals, where the use of herbal treatment for endometriosis is routine. The review was headed by Dr Andrew Flower and published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. “These findings suggest that Chinese herbs may be just as effective as certain conventional drug treatments for women suffering from endometriosis”, said Dr Flower. “This may mean that Chinese herbal medicine is more suitable for long-term use.” [1] Conventional treatments for endometriosis include anti-inflammatory drugs and painkillers, as well as hormonal manipulation therapies and oral contraceptives. However, hormonal treatments are known to increase the risk of breast cancer, while surgery carries the risk of bowel perforation. The current study is not the first in which natural therapies have shown themselves to be effective in the treatment of the condition. A 2007 study using the bark of the French maritime pine tree, known as Pcynogenol, was found to decrease symptoms of endometriosis by 33% when used for nearly a year after surgery. In the study, patients took 30 mg capsules of Pycnogel twice daily for 48 weeks immediately after morning and evening meals. The treatment was found to have reduced all symptoms from severe to moderate within four weeks. [2] Vitamin combinations have also been shown to be an effective therapy for endometriosis. Also in 2007, Italian researchers enrolled 234 women to assess the effectiveness of nutrition versus drug treatment for six months after surgery. Both the nutritional treatment, which included vitamins (B6, A, C and E), minerals (calcium, magnesium, selenium, zinc and iron), omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, as well as probiotic bacteria preparations, and the drug treatment were found to be effective in reducing menstrual pain, pelvic pain and pain during sexual intercourse. However, only the drug treatment was found to increase the risk of bone thinning and menopausal symptoms. [3] [1] Flower A et al. Chinese herbal medicine for endometriosis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2009; Issue 3. [2] Kohama et al. Effect of French maritime pine bark extract on endometriosis as compared with leuprorelin acetate. J Reprod Med. 2007 Aug;52(8):703-8. [3] Sesti et al. Hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy versus placebo in the control of painful symptoms after conservative surgery for endometriosis stage III-IV. A randomized comparative trial. Fertil Steril. 2007 Dec;88(6):1541-7. Author: Michael Jolliffe is a freelance writer based in Oxford, UK.

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